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Suggested Courses

Sather Gate (UC Berkeley photo)Recommendations for Courses with Available Seats

Looking for courses for Spring 2016? The courses listed on this page are of interest to a broad population of students, have either no prerequisites or prerequisites that are taken by a large percentage of students, and, at the time of posting, still had seats available. We'll be checking the list daily to remove courses that have filled.

Check back frequently. We will continue to add courses during Phase II of Tele-BEARS and the Adjustment period.

 

Instructor: SMALL, S A
AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 24 P 001 SEM: Researching “Mixed-Race” History and Images in the United States (1: PF)

CCN #: 00547, which is offered W 10-12P, 205 WHEELER

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People of mixed racial origins are one of the fastest growing populations in California and across the United States. This course provides an overview of their contemporary circumstances and describes some sources and methods available for studying these populations (including those of mixed Asian, Black, Chicano, Native American or white ancestry). We will review some of the main themes in writings about people of mixed racial origins; and we will examine various sources for identifying mixed race populations, including census, biographies, literature and films. This course will equip students with basic research skills that can be utilized for other projects in African American Studies, Ethnic Studies, History, Sociology, Anthropology and Cultural Studies.

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Instructor: MCHOMBO, S A
AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 24 P 002 SEM: Language and Politics in Southern Africa (1: PF)

CCN #: 00815, which is offered W 2-3P, 186 BARROWS

Recommendation: "I learned a lot about the culture in Africa, how different their schooling is, and how diverse they are in terms of language." - student in spring 2015 seminar "In order to have a more engaging presentation, I asked my dad about his family history in Nambia and learned about his parents. The conversation was very important to me and I would not have had it were it not for this seminar." student in spring 2015 seminar "Mchombo is amazing!" - student in fall 2014 seminar

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This seminar will focus on political developments in Southern Africa and the use of language in fostering national identity and attaining cultural emancipation. We will look at case studies representative of the dynamics of the region. The topics covered will include a brief history of the peoples of Southern Africa; family structure, kinship systems and traditional political institutions; cultural practices and religious beliefs; the impact of contact with western culture and civilization on language issues and political organization; language and its role in fostering national identity in post-independence Africa; models of national language policy in multi-ethnic societies; language use and democratic practice and human rights; the impact of AIDS on economic development and linguistic ecology; prospects of mother-education; and the use of African languages in science and technology. Since the course is a seminar, students will be expected to participate actively in the class. There will be a course reader. There will be no examinations. Grades will be based on one 500-word paper and class participation.

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Instructor: JOYCE, R
ANTHROPOLOGY 84 P 001 SEM: Race, Gender, and Social Life in Honduras: Reading Over the Shoulder of People in the Past (1)

CCN #: 02540, which is offered Tu 10-11A, 101 2251 COLLEGE

Recommendation: "I was really happy with this course because of the small size and I felt really comfortable. The professor never assumed that we knew certain things and that also added to the comfortable environment. There was a lot of discussion among the students and it was very productive."

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This seminar introduces students to how we learn about people in the past through the use of archival documents. Working with digital copies of documents from the colonial Spanish archives in Sevilla, Spain, Guatemala, and Comayagua, Honduras, we will "read over the shoulder" of the writers whose words form one of our most immediate links to Spanish colonial Honduran life. Students will learn how to locate archival documents online; how to read colonial handwriting; and how we can begin to understand more about society from even brief documents, like receipts for serving as a courier. Working together, we will discuss several longer documents about the lives of native Americans who were obliged to work for Spanish citizens and petitioned for relief, about free black residents of a military fort, and about illegal trade in sugar, rum, and tobacco.

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Instructor: SYJUCO, S
PRACTICE OF ART 100 P 001 STD: COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION (4)

CCN #: 04493, which is offered TuTh 2-5P, 395 KROEBER

Recommendation: Satisfies Arts and Literature breadth

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In this hands-on, project-based class in collaborative innovation, students will experience group creativity and team-based design by using techniques from across the disciplines of business, theatre, design, and art practice. They will leverage problem framing and solving techniques derived from critical thinking, systems thinking, and creative problem solving (popularly known today as "design thinking"). The course is grounded in a brief weekly lecture that sets out the theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts for particular innovation practices, but the majority of the class involves hands-on studio-based learning guided by an interdisciplinary team of teachers leading small group collaborative projects. Students will experience observation, problem-framing, divergent and convergent thinking, iterative solution testing, improvisation, storytelling, devised theatre, and public speaking and presentation activities. By engaging in these activities, ​the course ​provide​s​ students with​ ​the ​opportunity to develop new mindsets, skill-sets and toolsets for use in collaborative innovation efforts.

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Instructor: EICHER, A J
PRACTICE OF ART 100 P 002 STD: COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION (4)

CCN #: 04496, which is offered TuTh 2-5P, 178 WURSTER

Recommendation: Satisfies Arts and Literature breadth

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In this hands-on, project-based class in collaborative innovation, students will experience group creativity and team-based design by using techniques from across the disciplines of business, theatre, design, and art practice. They will leverage problem framing and solving techniques derived from critical thinking, systems thinking, and creative problem solving (popularly known today as "design thinking"). The course is grounded in a brief weekly lecture that sets out the theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts for particular innovation practices, but the majority of the class involves hands-on studio-based learning guided by an interdisciplinary team of teachers leading small group collaborative projects. Students will experience observation, problem-framing, divergent and convergent thinking, iterative solution testing, improvisation, storytelling, devised theatre, and public speaking and presentation activities. By engaging in these activities, ​the course ​provide​s​ students with​ ​the ​opportunity to develop new mindsets, skill-sets and toolsets for use in collaborative innovation efforts.

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Instructor: VON ROSPATT, A
BUDDHIST STUDIES 190 P 001 LEC: Topics in the Study of Buddhism: “Buddhist Thought in India” (4)

CCN #: 07680, which is offered TuTh 2-330P, 234 DWINELLE

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This course is an advanced introduction to the major teachings of Indian Buddhism and their philosophical elaborations. We will cover the core tenets attributed to the Buddha, and the later doctrinal and scholastic developments that turned Buddhism into one of the principal philosophical traditions of India. For this we will read select primary sources—in principle, extracts of the scriptures and later treatises—and academic articles and book chapters. This seminar-style class has a focus on discussions and students will write brief assignments, make presentations and write a final term paper rather than taking an exam. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: BOPEARACHCHI, C O
BUDDHIST STUDIES 150 P 001 LEC: The Origins and Development of Buddhist Art in South Asia (4)

CCN #: 07770, which is offered TuTh 11-1230P, 234 DWINELLE

Recommendation: Satisfies the Arts & Literature or Philosophy & Values breadth.

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Rather than offering a comprehensive survey, this course deals with select themes that shed light on the origins, development and diffusion of Buddhist art chronologically and geographically through a combined study that considers the archaeological record (excavations, coins, etc.), key religious texts and epigraphy. Typical themes will be the early notion of aniconism and the evolution of iconic art (Buddha and bodhisattva images); the depiction of Jatakas and other narratives in reliefs and painting; the cave sculptures of the Western Deccan; tantric art, temples and monasteries; the art, archaeology and architecture of South India and Sri Lanka; Indic Buddhist monuments in South-East Asia such Bagan in Burma, Borobudur, and Angkor. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: BECKMAN, S L
UNDERGRAD. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 190T P 003 LEC: COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION (4)

CCN #: 08270, which is offered TuTh 2-5P, 310 Jacobs Hall

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In this hands-on, project-based class in collaborative innovation, students will experience group creativity and team-based design by using techniques from across the disciplines of business, theatre, design, and art practice. They will leverage problem framing and solving techniques derived from critical thinking, systems thinking, and creative problem solving (popularly known today as "design thinking"). The course is grounded in a brief weekly lecture that sets out the theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts for particular innovation practices, but the majority of the class involves hands-on studio-based learning guided by an interdisciplinary team of teachers leading small group collaborative projects. Students will experience observation, problem-framing, divergent and convergent thinking, iterative solution testing, improvisation, storytelling, devised theatre, and public speaking and presentation activities. By engaging in these activities, ​the course ​provide​s​ students with​ ​the ​opportunity to develop new mindsets, skill-sets and toolsets for use in collaborative innovation efforts.

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Instructor: PATTERSON, M
UNDERGRAD. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 190T P 006 LEC: COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION (4)

CCN #: 08475, which is offered TuTh 2-5P, 310 jacobs Hall

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In this hands-on, project-based class in collaborative innovation, students will experience group creativity and team-based design by using techniques from across the disciplines of business, theatre, design, and art practice. They will leverage problem framing and solving techniques derived from critical thinking, systems thinking, and creative problem solving (popularly known today as "design thinking"). The course is grounded in a brief weekly lecture that sets out the theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts for particular innovation practices, but the majority of the class involves hands-on studio-based learning guided by an interdisciplinary team of teachers leading small group collaborative projects. Students will experience observation, problem-framing, divergent and convergent thinking, iterative solution testing, improvisation, storytelling, devised theatre, and public speaking and presentation activities. By engaging in these activities, ​the course ​provide​s​ students with​ ​the ​opportunity to develop new mindsets, skill-sets and toolsets for use in collaborative innovation efforts.

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Instructor: HELLMAN, D
CELTIC STUDIES 139 P 001 LEC: Irish Literature from 1800-Present (4)

CCN #: 10489, which is offered MWF 10-11A, 243 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature From the 17th century on, Ireland was a land of two primary spoken languages: Irish and English. Latin survived until the early 20th century as a written (and occasionally spoken) language of scholarly discussion, but it was almost never used during this period for literary or popular poetic texts. Although Irish was the language spoken by most Irish people until the middle of the 19th century and had a flourishing literary tradition (mainly poetic), there was little published in the language until the end of the 19th century. How much interpenetration was there between the two traditions? What sort of audiences existed for different kinds of literature? What was the Irish Literary Renaissance? What part did colonialism and nationalism play in the development of both language traditions in Ireland? All these questions will be addressed, if not answered to everyone’s satisfaction, in this course. Required Reading: to be announced.

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Instructor: VARIANO, E A
CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 24 P 001 SEM: Waves – Ideal, Real, and In Between (1)

CCN #: 14655, which is offered W 11-12P, 544 DAVIS

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Predicting sinusoidal wave motion has been one of the great successes of calculus and is a centerpiece of basic physics. However, many of the wave types observed in nature do not fit into this rather narrow mathematical description. This course will take a broad view of waves, exploring a wide variety of different wave types. Examples will be drawn from fields including biology, ecology, and physics, with a particular emphasis on the water waves encountered in environmental engineering. For each wave type we explore, we will consider the simplified mathematical models which try to capture the essence of the wave. We will explore the limits of these models and discuss the practical implications of making engineering decisions based on idealized models. The class will follow Gavin Pretor-Pinney’s armchair science book, “The Wave Watcher’s Companion,” with supplementary material presented in class to motivate and support group discussions.

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Instructor: MURPHY, T M
CLASSICS 10B P 001 LEC: Introduction to Roman Civilization (4)

CCN #: 15253, which is offered MWF 10-11A, 2040 VALLEY LSB

Recommendation: This course meets the L&S Breadth Requirements in Arts & Literature, Historical Studies and Philosophy & Values.

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This course presents an overview of the highlights of Roman civilization with particular emphasis on major literary works and how they reflect Roman culture. Texts to be read include Virgil's Aeneid; Suetonius' Twelve Caesars; Petronius' Satyricon; and Tacitus' Agricola.

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Instructor: PENA, J T
CLASSICS 17B P 001 LEC: Introduction to the Archaeology of the Roman World (4)

CCN #: 15274, which is offered TuTh 930-11A, 223 DWINELLE

Recommendation: This course meets the L&S Breadth Requirements in Arts & Literature and Historical Studies.

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This course provides undergraduate students with an introduction to the archaeology of the ancient Romans from Rome's origins in the Iron Age down to the disintegration of the Roman empire in the 6th century A.D. It aims to familiarize students with the more significant sites, monuments, artifact classes and works of art relating to the Roman world, and to introduce students to the important research questions in Roman archaeology, providing them with an appreciation of the methods that archaeologists employ to address these.

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Instructor: GRIFFITH, M
CLASSICS 28 P 001 LEC: The Classic Myths (4)

CCN #: 15289, which is offered MWF 1-2P, 145 DWINELLE

Recommendation: This course meets the L&S Breadth Requirements in Arts & Literature and Philosophy & Values.

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An exploration of the society, values, fantasies, and worldviews of the ancient Greeks and Romans as expressed in their mythology: their views on the origin and meaning of the world and of human beings; rival views about the nature of the gods; anxieties about marriage, competition, death, family dysfunction, sex and sexuality; political uses of myth (and invented history) to justify particular ethnic or local or familial interests; and in general the use of myth to think about, and give order to, human experience. The course will cover many of the major myths (creation and the Olympian gods and goddesses, Prometheus, Hercules, Oedipus, Odysseus, Medea, Aeneas, etc.) through readings of selections from epic poems, tragedies, and other primary sources (all in English translation), along with key visual material (vase paintings, sculpture, archaeological sites). We'll also consider some modern uses and adaptations of these ancient myths in movies and popular culture, and some of the most important theories of myth that have been proposed since the 19th century. The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the culture and values of ancient Greece and Rome, along with a range of some of the most exciting and influential works of Western literature. No previous experience in classical studies is required or expected.

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Instructor: PENA, J T
CLASSICS 39K P 001 SEM: Travel and Transport in the Ancient World (4)

CCN #: 15319, which is offered TuTh 330-5P, 134 DWINELLE

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This course examines how people moved both themselves and objects of various kinds from one place to another in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Drawing on the archaeological, literary, and pictorial evidence we consider a wide array of topics, including transport technology and infrastructure, the organization and costs of travel and transport, routes and travel times, banking, dining and overnighting while on the road, the packaging, labeling, and handling of cargoes, the roles of both short- and long-distance trade in the economy, the reasons why people traveled from place to place, extreme travel, and the general travel experience. We also explore recently developed digital technologies that allow us to better recreate and understand the nature and experience of travel and transport in pre-industrial times.

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Instructor: HALLETT, C H and PIERACCINI, L
CLASSICS 175F P 001 LEC: Roman Wall Painting (4)

CCN #: 15352, which is offered TuTh 1230-2P, 106 MOFFITT

Recommendation: This course meets the L&S Breadth Requirement in Arts & Literature.

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The art of painting was highly valued in ancient Italy from the earliest times. Archaeological evidence demonstrates that the pre-Roman cultures of Italy—such as the Greeks, Leucanians, and Etruscans—all made extensive use of painting in various contexts. This course will examine the relationship between Roman painting and the earlier pictorial traditions of ancient Italy, particularly that of the Etruscans.

A number of questions will be pursued. What role did painting play in Etruscan life? How “public” were the tomb paintings of the Etruscans, and what is the relationship of Etruscan funerary imagery to daily life? What paintings were available for later Romans to see when they took over Etruscan cities and cemeteries? And more importantly, what sort of Etruscan innovations, conventions, and subject matter were adopted (or not) by the Romans? What sort of paintings do we hear about in the writings of Latin authors? Battle paintings, for example, carried in triumphal processions, and described by Roman historians; or Greek ‘old master’ paintings purchased for extravagant sums by art collectors like Lucullus and Hortensius, and cherished as their prize possessions—to the dismay of Roman moralists. What kinds of pictures were set up as votives in Roman temples and public spaces? What designs and subjects did ordinary Romans choose to have painted on the walls of their homes, their villas, and their tombs?

This course will present the surviving evidence for a wide range of pictorial representation. It will include a sampling of the surviving paintings from Etruscan tombs; the earliest pictorial remains from the city of Rome itself; the elaborate suites of painted rooms found in the houses of Pompeii and Herculaneum on the Bay of Naples; and Roman mosaics—‘paintings in stone’—from Italy, North Africa, and the eastern Mediterranean. Some topics to be considered: the funerary and non funerary themes found in Etruscan tomb painting; the Etruscan contribution to Roman painting; the ‘four styles’ of Pompeian interior decoration; the architect Vitruvius’ denunciation of contemporary painting in the early Augustan period; the reproduction of Greek ‘old master’ paintings from pattern books; the surviving paintings of the Domus Aurea, the emperor Nero’s gigantic ‘Golden House’ in Rome.

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Instructor: PAPAZARKADAS, N
GREEK 2 P 001 LEC: Introductory Ancient Greek (4)

CCN #: 15603, which is offered MWF 9-10A, 229 DWINELLE

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N/A

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Instructor: MCCLAY, M F
GREEK 10 P 001 LEC: Intensive Elementary Ancient Greek (8)

CCN #: 15606, which is offered MTWTF 9-10A, 233 DWINELLE

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N/A

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Instructor: HUDAK, J J
LATIN 1 P 003 LEC: Elementary Latin (4)

CCN #: 15809, which is offered MTuWTh 12-1P, 225 DWINELLE

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N/A

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Instructor: BAPTISTE, M C
COLLEGE WRITING PROGRAM 1 P 001 LEC: Self-Editing to Cultivate Voice (2: PF)

CCN #: 16403, which is offered F 10-12P, 223 WHEELER

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This workshop course teaches the grammar and vocabulary of written English along with hands-on editing strategies for your own writing that enable you to proofread the papers you compose for other courses. We will delve into rhetorical grammar—examining how grammatical choices can influence your voice and argument. We will also focus on vocabulary study—methods to boost your comprehension and retention of new vocabulary as well as ensure you use new terms accurately.

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Instructor: BAPTISTE, M C
COLLEGE WRITING PROGRAM 1 P 002 LEC: Self-Editing to Cultivate Voice (2: PF)

CCN #: 16406, which is offered W 2-4P, 2032 VALLEY LSB

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This workshop course teaches the grammar and vocabulary of written English along with hands-on editing strategies for your own writing that enable you to proofread the papers you compose for other courses. We will delve into rhetorical grammar—examining how grammatical choices can influence your voice and argument. We will also focus on vocabulary study—methods to boost your comprehension and retention of new vocabulary as well as ensure you use new terms accurately.

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Instructor: GROVER, M
COLLEGE WRITING PROGRAM R1A P 023 LEC: Coming-of-Age: Representing the Journey to Adulthood (6)

CCN #: 16478, which is offered TuTh 3-6P, 223 WHEELER

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The expression “coming-of-age” carries provocative associations, such as sexual awakening, disillusionment, and embattlement. This course explores how different cultures and writers make sense of the concept. Through critical reading, analytical writing, and class discussion, we will examine the assumptions and arguments that influential writers make when portraying how individuals come of age. Our inquiry will be framed by committed participation in all facets of the writing process, including pre-writing activities, drafting, critique, and of course, revision, revision, and revision. The goal of this course is to help students develop skills required to produce writing assigned in college coursework, which includes: writing clear and well-developed thesis statements; supporting assertions with persuasive and appropriate evidence; constructing assignments with a clear logical structure; writing prose that fits the task at hand. The goal of this particular section is to train students to capably read genres of all kinds, and to infer how to write them with proficiency.

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Course Website: http://writing.berkeley.edu

Instructor: ROBERTS, B J
COLLEGE WRITING PROGRAM 21 P 002 LEC: Conflict Management for Academic Success at the University (3)

CCN #: 16540, which is offered MW 4-530P, 250 DWINELLE (effective 01/25/16)

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This course is for international, CE3, and other students who are new to UC Berkeley or to any American university. Students will learn and practice cross-cultural communication strategies to help them fully participate in academic life. Using conflict resolution (negotiation and mediation) as the substantive course theme, students will develop strategies for resolving communication problems, misunderstandings, and conflicts that can arise in academic settings and beyond. CW 21 also helps students to improve class participation skills, including understanding lectures and instructions; contributing to and leading group discussions; speaking up in class; participating in group projects; public speaking; scheduling and attending office hours; asking for and using feedback from professors; understanding American humor in the classroom; and participating in negotiation and mediation role-plays.

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Course Website: http://writing.berkeley.edu

Instructor: GROVER, M
COLLEGE WRITING PROGRAM 10A P 005 LEC: Introduction to Public Speaking (3)

CCN #: 16607, which is offered TuTh 2-330P, 103 WHEELER

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This is a course about effectively connecting in person with an audience to further cooperative goals and gain respect. We will study how talented speakers achieve this goal, with attention to the psychological dimensions of persuasion and audience engagement. To practice and strengthen your own public speaking, you will create and present three formal speeches plus a final group presentation; the course is designed to walk you through the steps needed to minimize stress and maximize the quality of your performance.

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Course Website: http://writing.berkeley.edu

Instructor: FUNG, I Y
EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE 39B P 101 SEM: Do-It-Yourself Experimental Atmospheric Science (3)

CCN #: 19017, which is offered Tu 3-6P, 210 JACOBS

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Design, build, measure! Experience the full cradle-to-grave process underpinning modern observational experiment. If you’re ever wanted to learn about photodiodes, statistical data analysis, waveplates, radiative transfer, amplifiers, computer control, and absorption spectroscopy all at the same time, this is the course for you. At a meta level, you will learn the basics of experimental design —how to ask a scientific question, estimate instrument requirements, and identify components. You will learn too how to build, calibrate, and test your instrument. Ultimately, you will deploy your instrument in the field and interpret your measurements in the context of a home-brew radiative transfer model. Completion of this course will arm you with the tools and confidence necessary to tackle scientific questions that will invariably arise as you continue to explore your world.

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Instructor: HURLEY, B R
EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES 111 P 001 LEC: Reading Global Politics in Contemporary East Asian Literature (4)

CCN #: 20509, which is offered TuTh 1230-2P, 223 DWINELLE

Recommendation: Satisfies the Arts & Literature, Historical Studies, or International Studies breadth.

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This class examines the global dynamics and local distinction of literary writings from contemporary East Asia. Beginning with the colonial connections among Tokyo, Shanghai and Seoul during the 1920s-1940s, and moving on to texts composed since 2000 in Manila, Hong Kong, India and elsewhere, the course considers how literary writers have grappled with an increasingly integrated global marketplace in which culture, ideas and people circulate alongside (and as) capital. Discussions will reflect on the confluence of culture and politics in literary writings that treat race tension, ecological crisis, capitalist catastrophe and other themes. Over the course of the semester, we will examine writings by Yokomitsu Riichi, Mu Shiying, Eileen Chang, Amitav Ghosh, V.S. Naipaul, and others. Primary readings will be supplemented by iconic works of cultural criticism, cinema and music. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: VOLPP, S Y
CHINESE 7B P 001 LEC: Introduction to Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (4)

CCN #: 20624, which is offered TuTh 930-11A, 106 MOFFITT

Recommendation: Satisfies the Arts & Literature breath.

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The second of a two-semester sequence introducing students to Chinese literature in translation. In addition to literary sources, a wide range of philosophical and historical texts will be covered, as well as aspects of visual and material culture. 7B focuses on late imperial, modern, and contemporary China. The course will focus on the development of sound writing skills. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: LAM, L
CHINESE 179 P 001 LEC: Exploring Premodern Chinese Novels (4)

CCN #: 20744, which is offered TuTh 1230-2P, 243 DWINELLE

Recommendation: Satisfies the Arts & Literature or Philosophy & Values breadth.

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Vernacular fiction in late imperial China emerged at the margins of official historiography, traveled through oral storytelling, and reached sophistication in the hands of literati. Covering the major genres and masterpieces of traditional Chinese novels including military, martial arts, libertine, and romantic stories, this course investigates how shifting boundaries brought about significant transformations of Chinese narrative at the levels of both form and content. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: PARK, H
KOREAN 7B P 001 LEC: Introduction to Modern Korean Literature and Culture (4)

CCN #: 21724, which is offered MWF 1-2P, 88 DWINELLE

Recommendation: Satisfies the Arts & Literature breath.

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A survey of modern Korean literature and culture in the 20th century, focusing on the development of nationalist aesthetics in both North and South Korea. Topics include "new woman" narratives, urban culture, colonial modernity, war and trauma, and diaspora. Texts to be examined include works of fiction, poetry, art, and film. All readings are in English. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: PARK, H
KOREAN 174 P 001 LEC: Modern Korean Fiction in Translation: "After 1945" (4)

CCN #: 21778, which is offered MWF 3-4P, 250 DWINELLE

Recommendation: Satisfies the Arts & Literature breath.

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This course surveys modern Korean fiction in the second half of the twentieth century. Beginning with liberation from Japanese colonial rule in 1945, this period in Korea was characterized by a highly charged political atmosphere, due to events such as the US occupation, the Korean War, the division, and the military dictatorship. In response, diverse and intense forms of activism emerged. This course will examine how modern Korean literature has been engaged with shaping historical memories by producing counter-narratives of critical historical and political events. Readings include major works in the genres of the novel, short fiction, and literary criticism. Various visual materials, including Korean films produced since the 1990s, will constitute significant component of course materials. All readings are in English. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: AN, J
KOREAN 189 P 001 LEC: Korean Film Authors (4)

CCN #: 21787, which is offered TuTh 330-5P, 215 DWINELLE

Recommendation: Satisfies the Arts & Literature breadth.

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This undergraduate course examines aesthetic features and thematic preoccupation of major Korean film authors. It begins with a brief survey of historical development and theoretical underpinnings of concept of “auteur” and advances an inquiry into the application of such theoretical tool in area of film criticism and culture in Korea. In addition to analyzing filmmaker's distinct style and thematic consistency, the course also situates and explores film authorship in relation to larger contexts and dynamics of Korean cinema: industrial structure, government censorship, social changes and cultural phenomena, intellectual development, technological shifts, and discourse of national cinema. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: VAN VLEET, S A
TIBETAN 115 P 001 LEC: Contemporary Tibet (4)

CCN #: 22109, which is offered TuTh 330-5P, 229 DWINELLE

Recommendation: Satisfies the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Studies breadth.

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This course seeks to develop a critical understanding of contemporary Tibet, characterized as it is by modernity, invasion, Maoism, liberalization, exile, and diaspora. It explores the cultural dynamism of the Tibetans over the last 100 years as expressed in literature, film, music, modern art, and political protest. The core topics include intra-Tibetan arguments regarding the preservation and "modernization" of traditional cultural forms, the development of new aesthetic creations and values, the constraints and opportunities on cultural life under colonialism and in the diaspora, and the religious nationalism of the recent political protests. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: BAUMANN, B
MONGOLIAN C117 P 001 LEC: Mongolian Buddhism (4)

CCN #: 22206, which is offered MWF 12-1P, 79 DWINELLE

Recommendation: Satisfies the Historical Studies or Philosophy & Values breadth.

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This course covers the history of Mongolian Buddhism from its inception in the Yuan dynasty to the present. The importance of Mongolian Buddhism to the greater dharma lies not only with the ways of its priests but also with the means of its patrons, the Mongol aristocracy, in forging a distinctive tradition in Inner Asia and disseminating it throughout the world. While maintaining a historical thread throughout, this course will examine in detail some of the tradition’s many facets, including Mongolian-Buddhist politics, the politics of incarnation, the establishment of monasteries, economics, work in the sciences, astral science and medicine, ritual practice, literature, sculpture and painting, music and dance, and more. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: CORONADO, R
ETHNIC STUDIES 24 P 002 SEM: Queer Latino Studies: Theory in the Flesh (1: PF)

CCN #: 31079, which is offered Tu 2-3P, 108 WHEELER

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In the 1980s and as a result of their involvement in the various social movements of the 1970s, Latinas and other women of color began to publish what are now canonical texts in women of color feminism, books such as This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color (1983) and Loving in the War Years (1983). Yet queer Latino men remained relatively silent. Why was this the case? What were the conditions of possibility that allowed Latinas to consciously and politically engage in the public sphere by publishing their work? We will begin with these questions as we focus our attention on these early writings by queer Latinas. We will then trace the emergence of queer Latinas/os in the public sphere. That is, we will study literature, art, and film that represented queer Latinas/os.

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Instructor: CHEN, M Y
GENDER AND WOMEN'S STUDIES 24 P 001 SEM: An Overview of Gender and Women's Studies (1: PF)

CCN #: 32924, which is offered W 12-1P, 602 BARROWS

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The class prepares students for scholarship in the major by reading scholarship of, having focused discussion about, and, finally, attending actual talks of feminist scholars who are scheduled to appear in the Gender and Women's Studies lecture series for the semester.

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Instructor: STEHLIN, J G
GEOGRAPHY 20 P 001 LEC: Globalization (4)

CCN #: 36203, which is offered TuTh 330-5P, 105 NORTH GATE

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Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. How and why are geographical patterns of employment, production and consumption unstable in the contemporary world? What are the consequences of NAFTA, an expanded European Community and post-colonial migration flows? How is global restructuring culturally reworked locally and nationally?

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Course Website: http://geography.berkeley.edu/courses/globalization-4/

Instructor: EKMAN, P
GEOGRAPHY 160B P 001 LEC: American Cultural Landscapes, 1900's to now (4)

CCN #: 36337, which is offered TuTh 11-1230P, 145 MCCONE

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Introduces ways of seeing and interpreting American histories and cultures, as revealed in everyday built surroundings--homes, highways, farms, factories, stores, recreation areas, small towns, city districts and regions. Encourages students to read landscapes as records of past and present social relations, and to speculate for themselves about cultural meaning.

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Course Website: http://geography.berkeley.edu/courses/american-cultural-lanscapes-1900-present-2/

Instructor: CHIANG, J C
GEOGRAPHY 40 P 001 LEC: Intro to Earth System Sciences (4)

CCN #: 36899, which is offered WF 930-11A, 575 MCCONE

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The goals of this introductory Earth System Science course are to achieve a scientific understanding of important problems in global environmental change and to learn how to analyze a complex system using scientific methods. Earth System Science is an interdisciplinary field that describes the cycling of energy and matter between the different spheres (atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, cryosphere, and lithosphere) of the earth system. Under the overarching themes of human-induced climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and biodiversity loss, we will explore key concepts of solar radiation, plate tectonics, atmospheric and oceanic circulation, and the history of life on Earth.

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Course Website: http://geography.berkeley.edu/courses/introduction-to-earth-system-science-4/

Instructor: FELDMAN, K S
GERMAN 39Q P 001 LEC: Bible Stories and Literary Criticism (3)

CCN #: 37440, which is offered MWF 10-11A, 201 WHEELER

Recommendation: "This class is different from the usual "Intro to -" and Professor Feldman is amazing." - student in fall 2008 seminar "I felt very welcome and even cared about in the class. Professor Feldman knew each student by name and I personally felt she cared about how we were doing in this class and our others as well." - student in fall 2008 seminar

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In this 3-unit freshman & sophomore seminar we will study representations of two important biblical figures, namely Job and Moses. Both of these figures can be interpreted in terms of psychological drama, political allegory, ethical treatise, poetic construction, anthropological study, existential parable, and in other fashions. We will incorporate elements of each of these approaches in our analyses. In the first half of the course we will slowly work through the book of Job and alongside that we will study several literary and philosophical interpretations of Job, Job’s friends, and God’s lengthy speech at the end of the book; commentators include Carl Jung, Martin Buber, Antonio Negri, Hans Jauss, Abigail Pelham and Robert Alter*. In the second half of the course we will read Freud’s interpretations of Moses. These include Freud’s essay on a statue of Moses by Michelangelo, which we will consider in both artistic and literary terms; and Freud’s strange, sometimes outlandish, last book Moses and Monotheism. We will read these texts closely and slowly, together with interpretations by authors including Jan Assman, Joseph Vogl*, Cathy Caruth, Bluma Goldstein*, Peter Schäfer, Rachel Blass, and Daniel Boyarin*. * = UC Berkeley faculty (current faculty; faculty emerita or former visiting professor)!

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Instructor: FELDMAN, K S
GERMAN 39Q P 001 LEC: Bible Stories and Literary Criticism (3)

CCN #: 37440, which is offered MWF 10-11A, 201 WHEELER

Recommendation: Satisfies Arts and Literature breadth. "This class is different from the usual "Intro to -" and Professor Feldman is amazing." - student in fall 2008 seminar "I felt very welcome and even cared about in the class. Professor Feldman knew each student by name and I personally felt she cared about how we were doing in this class and our others as well." - student in fall 2008 seminar

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In this 3-unit freshman & sophomore seminar we will study representations of two important biblical figures, namely Job and Moses. Both of these figures can be interpreted in terms of psychological drama, political allegory, ethical treatise, poetic construction, anthropological study, existential parable, and in other fashions. We will incorporate elements of each of these approaches in our analyses. In the first half of the course we will slowly work through the book of Job and alongside that we will study several literary and philosophical interpretations of Job, Job’s friends, and God’s lengthy speech at the end of the book; commentators include Carl Jung, Martin Buber, Antonio Negri, Hans Jauss, Abigail Pelham and Robert Alter*. In the second half of the course we will read Freud’s interpretations of Moses. These include Freud’s essay on a statue of Moses by Michelangelo, which we will consider in both artistic and literary terms; and Freud’s strange, sometimes outlandish, last book Moses and Monotheism. We will read these texts closely and slowly, together with interpretations by authors including Jan Assman, Joseph Vogl*, Cathy Caruth, Bluma Goldstein*, Peter Schäfer, Rachel Blass, and Daniel Boyarin*. * = UC Berkeley faculty (current faculty; faculty emerita or former visiting professor)!

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Course Website: http://fss.berkeley.edu/seminar.lasso?sem_ID=SM007287

Instructor: MAVROUDI, M and Lucarelli, R
HISTORY C188C P 001 LEC: Magic, Science and Religion (4)

CCN #: 39642, which is offered TuTh 11-1230P, 60 EVANS

Recommendation: Satisfies Historical Studies or Philosophy and Values breadth. "Everyone will agree that Professor Mavroudi is a brilliant scholar with a teaching style that is quite engaging." "Professor Lucarelli brings a deep knowledge of the subject and is very good at engaging the students."

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Modern Western societies regard reason as the ultimate source and test of knowledge and look upon science as the primary arbiter of rationality. This is the result of an intellectual attitude that became mainstream during the age of the Enlightenment (late seventeenth-late eighteenth centuries). Towards the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth century, scholars discussed the relationship between science, religion, and magic. For example, for Sir James George Frazer, one of the founding fathers of modern anthropology, human belief evolved from primitive magic to religion to science. This course will explore magic as an experimental science within the learned traditions of civilizations that we consider as fundamental for a modern Western identity: from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome to the medieval and early modern Middle East, Byzantium, and Europe. The primary sources used for this exploration will be texts on demons, magic, divination, and the sophisticated philosophical background to such beliefs. In addition, archeological remains pertinent to these practices such as talismans, amulets, and other magical objects will be discussed.

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Course Website: http://bigideascourses.berkeley.edu/

Instructor: MISHLER, B D
INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY 24 P 001 SEM: The Darwinian Revolution (1)

CCN #: 42103, which is offered Th 10-11A, 4110 VALLEY LSB

Recommendation: "The strengths of this course revolved around the charismatic personality of Dr. MIshler and his engaging discussions." - student in spring 2015 seminar "Very interesting, engaging, and open to new ideas. It was always a pleasure to come, and I always left with something new to think about." - spring 2011 seminar "I loved the professor. He was an engaging and interesting man." - spring 2011 seminar

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The Darwinian Revolution was one of the greatest upheavals in human thought, involving the very basis of our self-awareness: Where did we come from? What is or should be the basis for our ethics and social behavior? Where are we going? Topics to be considered include the historical antecedents of Darwin's theories; the scientific evidence for evolution and natural selection; the impact of Darwinism on religion, social theory, and ethics; later scientific developments and recent challenges by latter-day creationists. The goal is to use these interdisciplinary topics as an exemplar of scientific methods and change, and of the unsteady relationship between science and the public. In addition to attending and participating in each week's lecture/discussion, each student will be required to write a short paper (five pages maximum) due at the end of the semester.

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Instructor: WILLIAMS, C M
INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY 24 P 002 SEM: Burning Hot and Cold: How do Ectotherms Maintain Metabolism and Performance in Variable Temperatures? (1)

CCN #: 42106, which is offered Tu 2-3P, 4110 VALLEY LSB

Recommendation: "The discussions held during class time were particularly beneficial to my understanding of the material. It was very dependent on the students' motivation to read the material well/ thoroughly, and it was nice to see this done consistently." - student in spring 2015 seminar

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You and I regulate our body temperatures tightly at around 98 °F, which means our metabolic enzymes can be perfectly adapted to perform at that temperature. If our core body temperature deviates from that set point by just a few degrees we feel sick, and 10 °F of deviation will likely cause death. The core body temperature of ectotherms fluctuates with environmental temperatures, meaning they will regularly experience swings of 40 °F or more. Some ectotherms can survive temperatures as hot as 170 °F, and others as low as -70 °F! How do they maintain metabolism and performance in the face of this thermal variability? We will meet to discuss readings related to these topics. Student participation in discussions is required.

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Instructor: LOOY, C
INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY 24 P 004 SEM: "The discussions held during class time were particularly beneficial to my understanding of the material. It was very dependent (1: PF)

CCN #: 42112, which is offered Tu 9-10A, 1101 VALLEY LSB

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During this seminar we will discuss what profound impact plants have on the functioning of our planet’s surface, atmosphere and ecosystems. We will start off with the transition to land and the emergence of terrestrial ecosystems. We will explore ancient fossilized plant communities and their ecological properties, and examine how major extinction intervals affected their evolution. In addition, we will tour the plant fossil collection of the UC Museum of Paleontology.

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Instructor: CALDWELL, R L
INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY 24 P 006 SEM: Animal Navigation: Which Way is Home? (1)

CCN #: 42118, which is offered M 2-3P, 5192 VALLEY LSB

Recommendation: "This class helped me realize I want to do research after college." - student in spring 2015 seminar "The teacher was approachable and fascinating. The course topic was engaging; human navigation is something that is interesting. Conducting the experiment was fun and helpful in learning how to conduct experiments on our own." - student in spring 2015 seminar

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A homing pigeon can return to its loft after being shipped one thousand km to a place it has never been. A whale spends its summers in the Bering Sea and its winters near Maui. A female sea turtle returns for the first time to a beach where she hatched thirty years earlier to lay her own eggs. A Monarch butterfly flies south two thousand km to spend the winter in a secluded grove in central Mexico. A limpet returns forty cm to a favorite depression in a rock. The abilities of animals to navigate have intrigued biologists for decades. We will read a series of papers describing how animals navigate and how they use such methods as landmarks, celestial cues, and geomagnetic fields to determine where to go and what route to follow. We will also attempt to replicate experiments that suggest that humans are able to navigate using geomagnetic fields. At the end of the semester, each student will be required to write a short review paper discussing navigation and orientation by an animal of his or her choice. This seminar is as much about the process of science as it is about animal navigation. We will first explore examples of animal navigation and how the underlying mechanisms are being researched. We will then examine experiments that suggest a human navigation ability based on geomagnetic input, and finally we will design an experiment to test if humans have the ability to detect and/or use a geomagnetic sense as do many other animals.

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Instructor: BHANDARI, R
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES FIELD MAJ 100A P 001 LEC: Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis (4)

CCN #: 45515, which is offered TuTh 1230-2P, 277 CORY

Recommendation: Meets International Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth requirements.

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This course, required of all ISF Majors but open to all students, provides an introduction to the works of foundational social theorists of the nineteenth century, including Karl Marx and Max Weber. Written in what might be called the “pre disciplinary” period of the modern social sciences, these classic works cross the boundaries of anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology, and are today claimed by these and other disciplines as essential texts. We will read intensively and critically from their respective works, situating their intellectual contributions in the history of social transformations wrought by industrialization and urbanization, political revolution, and the development of modern consumer society in nineteenth-century Europe. But we will also make efforts to evaluate their intellectual contributions in light of recent scholarship about contemporary social issues, exploring ways in which scholars across the social sciences and humanities continue to interpret their respective contributions. The class meets twice a week in lecture and once in section and has no prerequisites.

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Course Website: http://live-isf.pantheon.berkeley.edu/courses/spring/isf-courses

Instructor: MAZZOTTI, M
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES FIELD MAJ C100G P 001 LEC: Science, Technology and Society (4)

CCN #: 45536, which is offered TuTh 930-11A, 102 MOFFITT

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Be it bugs, buildings, or bits, what humans imagine and construct is tightly interconnected with the societies they live in. This course provides an overview of the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) as a way to study how our knowledge and technology shape and are shaped by social, political, historical, economic, and other factors. We will learn key concepts of the field (e.g. how technologies are understood and used differently in different communities) and apply them to a wide range of topics, including geography, history, environmental and information science, and others. Questions this course will address include: how are scientific facts constructed? How are values embedded in technical systems? Can non-humans have agency? Is it possible to dissociate science and politics? What is scientific evidence and how do we use it?

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Instructor: PERCO, G
ITALIAN STUDIES 1 P 002 LEC: ELEMENTARY ITALIAN (5)

CCN #: 46906, which is offered MTWTF 9-10A, 254 DWINELLE

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Course conducted entirely in Italian This course is for beginners and focuses on developing basic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in Italian. The course is taught in Italian. Italian, not English, will be spoken in class at all times; students will be exposed to authentic Italian material from films, songs, websites, and will have the opportunity to practice their listening and speaking skills on a daily basis. At the end of the semester, students will be able to use Italian to talk about themselves, their family, town, friends, and interests, as well as to describe present and past events in Italian and to converse with peers about their everyday life. Course Requirements: Five hours per week. Weekly quizzes, a midterm, an oral exam, final project and a final. Required texts: Sentieri, 2nd edition, Julia M. Cozzarelli, Vista Higher Learning Publishing, 2015. [link to textbook: http://vistahigherlearning.com/store/ucberkeley.htm/sentieri-2nd-edition.html] Webster's New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397 Recommended texts: English Grammar for Students of Italian, 3rd edition- S. Adorni, K Primorac. Olivia and Hill. ISBN 9780934034401 Prerequisites: None. Italian 1 presumes no former study of Italian.

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Instructor: PERCO, G
ITALIAN STUDIES 1 P 004 LEC: ELEMENTARY ITALIAN (5)

CCN #: 46912, which is offered MTWTF 11-12P, 255 DWINELLE

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Course conducted entirely in Italian This course is for beginners and focuses on developing basic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in Italian. The course is taught in Italian. Italian, not English, will be spoken in class at all times; students will be exposed to authentic Italian material from films, songs, websites, and will have the opportunity to practice their listening and speaking skills on a daily basis. At the end of the semester, students will be able to use Italian to talk about themselves, their family, town, friends, and interests, as well as to describe present and past events in Italian and to converse with peers about their everyday life. Course Requirements: Five hours per week. Weekly quizzes, a midterm, an oral exam, final project and a final. Required texts: Sentieri, 2nd edition, Julia M. Cozzarelli, Vista Higher Learning Publishing, 2015. [link to textbook: http://vistahigherlearning.com/store/ucberkeley.htm/sentieri-2nd-edition.html] Webster's New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397 Recommended texts: English Grammar for Students of Italian, 3rd edition- S. Adorni, K Primorac. Olivia and Hill. ISBN 9780934034401 Prerequisites: None. Italian 1 presumes no former study of Italian.

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Instructor: PERCO, G
ITALIAN STUDIES 1 P 005 LEC: ELEMENTARY ITALIAN (5)

CCN #: 46915, which is offered MTWTF 12-1P, 254 DWINELLE

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Course conducted entirely in Italian This course is for beginners and focuses on developing basic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in Italian. The course is taught in Italian. Italian, not English, will be spoken in class at all times; students will be exposed to authentic Italian material from films, songs, websites, and will have the opportunity to practice their listening and speaking skills on a daily basis. At the end of the semester, students will be able to use Italian to talk about themselves, their family, town, friends, and interests, as well as to describe present and past events in Italian and to converse with peers about their everyday life. Course Requirements: Five hours per week. Weekly quizzes, a midterm, an oral exam, final project and a final. Required texts: Sentieri, 2nd edition, Julia M. Cozzarelli, Vista Higher Learning Publishing, 2015. [link to textbook: http://vistahigherlearning.com/store/ucberkeley.htm/sentieri-2nd-edition.html] Webster's New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397 Recommended texts: English Grammar for Students of Italian, 3rd edition- S. Adorni, K Primorac. Olivia and Hill. ISBN 9780934034401 Prerequisites: None. Italian 1 presumes no former study of Italian.

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Instructor: BELLEZZA, A M
ITALIAN STUDIES 1S P 001 LEC: Italian for Spanish Speakers (6)

CCN #: 46918, which is offered MTWTF 10-11A, 206 DWINELLE

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EQUIVALENT OF ITALIAN STUDIES 1 AND 2 COMBINED FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS OF SPANISH OR THOSE WITH COLLEGE LEVEL SPANISH 4 OR HIGHER (EXCEPTIONS MADE WITH DEPARTMENTAL CONSENT) This course is specifically designed with the needs and strengths of native or proficient speakers of Spanish in mind, so that the similarities between the two languages can be used to promote specific learning paths. This is an intensive Italian language course, which combines TWO semesters in ONE, covering all the materials usually covered in Italian Studies 1 and 2 of Elementary Italian. The course provides an accelerated introduction to Italian, allowing students who successfully complete it to enroll in Italian 3, gaining faster access to Upper Division courses. The general objectives are to provide students with the basic tools for oral and written communication in Italian, but also to offer them the opportunity to learn about Italian culture, to reflect on intercultural differences and similarities, and to become more aware ‘multilingual subjects’ in our plurilingual society. Workload: This course is comprised of a master lecture class, meeting 5 times per week, and a drill/conversation section, meeting 2 times per week. Regular and continued attendance of both classes is mandatory. Due to the intensive nature of this course, students should plan to study one to two hours a day and be committed to a fast-paced learning environment. Texts: Sentieri, 2nd edition, Julia M. Cozzarelli, Vista Higher Learning Publishing, 2015. ISBN 978-1-62680-803-4 An Italian dictionary for purchase to be announced by the instructor.

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Instructor: FULLER, M G
ITALIAN STUDIES 24 P 001 SEM: Italy’s War Over Memories of War: Fascism and World War II in Film (1: PF)

CCN #: 46950, which is offered Tu 9-10A, 6331 DWINELLE

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In this seminar we will watch and discuss great Italian films depicting Italy’s fascist era (1922-1943) and Italy during World War II (1940-1945). Italy entered the War on the side of Nazi Germany, but exited it on the side of the United States. This change of allegiance is still the subject of shame, derision, and debate among Italians; along the way, seminal films, dramatic and comic, have been made on the subject. We will view these films as both works of art and openings onto a fraught historical topic that has continued to divide Italians, sometimes dangerously, up to the present. Given the time over which our films have been made (beginning with Rossellini’s 1945 Rome Open City, and ending with the 2007 My Brother is an Only Child), we will also be able to remark on how stances toward fascism and the War have changed over recent generations.

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Instructor: STEIMATSKY, N
ITALIAN STUDIES 70 P 001 LEC: THE ITALIAN CINEMA (3)

CCN #: 46951, which is offered MW 11-12P, 142 DWINELLE

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Lecture: MW 11-12 Screening: M 2-4 This Course Meets the L&S Breadth Requirement for Historical Studies OR Arts & Literature. This course is a brief introduction to the history of Italian cinema. We will study major auteurs and genres of Italian cinema in the context of Italian culture and history from 1895 to the present. Film clips will be shown in lectures along with complete film screenings during the weekly film lab. All students must attend both the weekly lectures and screenings. Texts and films to be announced. Prerequisites: none. No prior knowledge of Italian cinema or theory is necessary.

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Instructor: LEVERS, S W
ITALIAN STUDIES 112 P 001 LEC: SIXTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE AND CULTURE: The Italian Renaissance in Words and Images (4)

CCN #: 47005, which is offered MWF 3-4P, 206 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature Conducted in English with readings in English. In this course we will read several notable works from the Italian Renaissance and watch modern film adaptations of them. The course will allow students to not only become familiar with important pieces of literature and political theory, but also to investigate questions about the way modernity portrays the Renaissance, and about how film portrays literature. We will read two works by Niccolò Machiavelli, “The Mandrake Root” and “The Prince,” watching a stage version of the first and a film closely related to the themes of the second, Paolo Sorrentino’s “Il Divo.” We will then read selections from Ariosto’s Orlando furioso and watch Ermanno Olmi’s “Il Mestiere delle Armi,” followed by selections from Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata and operatic versions of its more popular episodes (“Armida” and “Tancredi and Clorinda”). This course will be taught in English. Grades will be determined by active participation, three essays and a final exam. Prerequisites: none.

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Instructor: BROWNSTEIN, S
JEWISH STUDIES 39M P 001 SEM: Hasidim, Mitnagdim, Haskallah–Jewish Society in Eastern Europe (2)

CCN #: 47803, which is offered W 10-12P, 332 GIANNINI

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During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in Eastern Europe, Jews divided themselves into different social groupings, primarily the Jewish orthodoxy, the Jewish Enlightenment, and the colorful Hasidim. These groups were often at odds with each other, generating heated controversy and acrimony, and at times joined forces against common enemies. How and why did these groups arise? What were their ideologies, and what were the tactics of their struggles? How did they shape Jewish society today, and in what forms do they persist? These are some of the questions we will examine in this class.

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Instructor: PERLMUTTER, S, CAMPBELL, J, AND LOMBROZO, T
LETTERS AND SCIENCE 22 P 001 LEC: SENSE AND SENSIBILITY AND SCIENCE (3)

CCN #: 51927, which is offered MW 12-2P, 150 GSPP

Recommendation: Satisfies Philosophy and Values, Physical Science, or Social and Behavioral Science breadth. "Professor Perlmutter's passion and rigor can be seen through his lectures and demonstrations, and his genuine intellectual curiosity is contagious." "Professor Campbell has been an absolute delight; my personal philosophy has grown so much." "Professor Lombrozo is an amazing professor! She is careful and effective in addition to being enthusiastic about the subject matter."

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The approaches to problem-solving developed by scientists have proven to be quite effective, and yet we as individuals, groups, and larger societies do not often seem to be able to take advantage even of rational approaches to problems--let alone the "hyper-rationality" offered by science. Watching the political process of our country--or even the discussions of a small committee--can therefore often feel quite disheartening. We should be able to do better! The course begins with an overview of the methods and heuristics (and jargon) that a physicist usually picks up in the course of graduate school. We will use lots of small-group exercises, discussion problems, and "clickers" to give a bit of an experiential sense of how these approaches and techniques work. The goal here will be to first convey the optimistic (arrogant) fiction that any problem can be solved rationally -- a fiction that we use to focus our efforts for long enough to potentially succeed. Then we show the pessimistic (skeptical) side of the approach, where we recognize how easy it is to fool ourselves; and we (rationally) try out methods that science has developed over the years to catch ourselves seeing patterns in random noise, getting results that we expect, and generally biasing results inadvertently because we have fallen in love with a theory. Rationality by itself does not solve any problems or answer any questions. Its efficaciousness depends on how we combine it with our drives, goals, and desires--and perhaps our less-linear-algorithm-based intuitions. This synthesis of the rational and arational occurs at the individual level of a person figuring out a problem or making a decision. It also is in play (at issue) when a larger social group or society debates, plans, …and votes. The second half of this course will discuss the many issues that arise when this synthesis occurs, looking at both successful models and dysfunctional examples of this activity. We will draw here on the relevant literature -- and real-world examples--from philosophy, cognitive and social psychology, game theory, economics, political science, law, and negotiation and leadership studies (in fact, computer sciences and psychiatry turn out to be relevant too). We will again use small-group exercises, discussion problems, and "clickers," to give an experiential sense of the issues for this half of the course as well. In both halves of the course we will use real-world examples of debates and decisions. A number of fundamental questions arise in this discussion: What can we learn about objectivity, an underlying goal of science? Sometimes it is argued that ultimately there are only various power groupings fighting over which view is to dominate, and that 'objective' is simply a compliment that the most powerful pay to their own views. In this sense, is science itself just another powerful religion, with its own priesthood? And, if not, can we pinpoint the difference, and perhaps use this recognition as a tool to help us determine how to find experts that we should trust, and to improve approaches to group decision making?

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Instructor: JACKSON, S and DE MONCHAUX, N
LETTERS AND SCIENCE 25 P 001 LEC: Thinking Through Art and Design @ Berkeley (3)

CCN #: 51930, which is offered MW 12-2P, OFF CAMPUS

Recommendation: Satisfies Arts and Literature breadth

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In January of 2016, the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) opens a new building, and a new chapter in the story of arts and design at Berkeley, with the exhibition "The Architecture of Life." Tied into the exhibit as well as a range of other performances and events around campus, and taught within the new museum after its January 26 opening, Thinking across the Arts and Design at Berkeley: The Architecture of Life, is a no-experience-assumed immersion in how to connect thinking, watching, listening and making on the Berkeley campus. With a range of outside speakers connected to the BAMPFA building and exhibit, as well as the CalPerformances events attended by the class, the course will involve close readings, close viewings of buildings and objects, and close listening and engagement with music, dance and theater. Students in the course will be equipped not only to understand and engage individual artistic and design disciplines, but also to connect their ideas and intentions to each other, across a range of creative and historical disciplines.

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Course Website: http://bigideascourses.berkeley.edu/

Instructor: AMUNDSON, R G
LETTERS AND SCIENCE C30V P 001 LEC: Environmental Issues (4)

CCN #: 51966, which is offered TuTh 930-11A, 159 MULFORD

Recommendation: Satisfies Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Science breadth. "Very passionate about his topic; brought interesting new perspectives." "Very enthusiastic, knowledgeable, and clear excellent lectures."

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n this century, society faces environmental problems that are global in their scale and that will have long-term effects on the habitability of our planet. These problems also touch us as individuals, causing us to make choices and responses based on ethical and economic factors. The nature of our collective choices will in turn shape how each environmental problem ultimately plays out in this century. In this course, we will examine three problems that are currently of concern, and that are subjects of on-going debate (and jest) in the media: food production and eating choices, urbanization and consumer choices, energy consumption and climate change. To understand these issues, we will examine the physical constraints of our planet, and then place our present human situation into a historical context. We will discuss how science provides information relevant to these problems. We will look at alternative views of the importance and severity of these problems, especially benefiting from guest lectures by professors and professionals in diverse fields. We will examine our own views on these topics, and assess our own footprint on the environment. Course objectives include an enhanced understanding of our planetary constraints, an enhanced understanding of how and why we all make our individual choices that affect the environment, and an enhancement of critical thinking skills for evaluating environmental issues and for becoming environmentally aware citizens.

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Course Website: http://lsdiscovery.berkeley.edu/detail_lsd.php?identity=329

Instructor: ACKERLY, D D, SEDLAK, D, SILVER, W, WEISSMAN, S
LETTERS AND SCIENCE C46 P 001 LEC: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE FUTURE OF CALIFORNIA (4)

CCN #: 51990, which is offered MWF 9-10A, 101 BARKER

Recommendation: Satisfies Biological Science breadth. David Ackerly: "He was a great lecturer; passionate, super well-connected, extremely knowledgeable, and enthusiastic!" David Sedlak: "Knows and is able to present the material really well. Enthusiasm really shines through." Whendee Silver: "Great professor. Enthusiastic about the topic and makes it fun. Cares about her students and teaching." "Weissman’s obvious passion for the subject matter was infectious, and he was the most student-focused professor I’ve had."

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Global environmental change, particularly climate change, is rapidly emerging as the defining environmental issue of the 21st century. Climate change will bring widespread impacts to California, as well as the possibility of novel opportunities for innovation and global leadership to reduce its magnitude and adapt to new challenges. California has exceptional natural resources, high levels of biological and societal diversity, and a strong and vibrant economy. The environment, history, and economy of California are strongly linked to climate, and how climatic conditions vary in space and time. We are also intimately connected to the rest of the world through physical, biological and social connections (e.g., climate dynamics, invasive species, economic markets, etc.). California has a long history as a leader in environmental policy and industrial innovation in the face of new challenges. Understanding the impacts of climate change in California, and the opportunities and barriers to respond and both reduce the rate of change and the magnitude of its impacts, is essential–as citizens and voters–and serves as a microcosm of the challenges faced globally.

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Instructor: BUEHLER, T
LETTERS AND SCIENCE 70A P 001 LEC: Physics and Music (3)

CCN #: 52011, which is offered MW 1-2P, 4 LECONTE

Recommendation: Satisfies Physical Science breadth. "Very clear & good at explaining concepts! Great at lecturing. Always stayed longer than needed during office hours. Cares a lot about students & what they learn!" "Good preparation for class, and he made learning enjoyable. He has a good sense of humor and is very good at explaining the topics. I appreciated his focus on concepts over just the math of problems."

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Does the Campanile sound out of tune to you? What does this have to do with our understanding of the Big Bang? And how would thinking about this help me to write a better English essay, defend an innocent person accused of murder, save the world from the next plague, or at least understand why my friend can't carry a tune? Physics and Music is a course designed to help students think about how to approach the world with the eyes, ears, and mind of a scientist. We will use the domain of music and sound to ask what we can learn about the nature of reality and the methods that we humans have developed to discover how the world works. The mysteries of music have long inspired scientists to invent new tools of thought, and some of the earliest scientific concepts were invented to understand music. Surprisingly the concepts that underlie our approach to music appear again and again in the world around us, and they are still at play in the very latest theories and experiments of fundamental physics. Questions as simple as "Why do different instruments playing the same note sound so different?" can lead to profound answers about the physical world--and our human-limited capacity to explore it. This course is not just for musicians or scientists. The material is accessible to students without a math or science—or music—background; and science majors will learn to better articulate what it is that science is about. Fundamentally, the course will model scientific curiosity and discipline to train you to ask the kinds of keen questions that will lead you to new levels of understanding.

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Course Website: http://lsdiscovery.berkeley.edu/detail_lsd.php?identity=339

Instructor: JEANLOZ, R and BASRI, G
LETTERS AND SCIENCE C70T P 001 LEC: The Planets (3)

CCN #: 52017, which is offered TuTh 8-930A, 10 EVANS

Recommendation: Satisfies Physical Science breadth.

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Our Solar System contains profound mysteries, some that still stump astronomers and geologists. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the Sun in only certain ways? How do planets form, and why do some have bizarre moons? What makes the Earth hospitable to life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will explore the mysteries of planets, moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe. Students in this class will have the opportunity to observe through a telescope.

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Course Website: http://lsdiscovery.berkeley.edu/detail_lsd.php?identity=328

Instructor: BOUSSO, R and RICHARDS, M
LETTERS AND SCIENCE 125 P 001 LEC: Time (4)

CCN #: 52059, which is offered TuTh 2-330P, 150 GSPP

Recommendation: Satisfies Physical Science breadth. "Professor Bousso was particularly awesome. He was able to break down extremely complicated concepts that I had trouble understanding from reading physics books, to a simplified manner that someone without a physics background could understand." "Professor Richards is honestly the best professor I’ve had at Berkeley thus far. He is so knowledgeable but is able to explain things in a basic way. His passion and zeal is truly inspiring. More than that, he is approachable and understanding, never treating a student’s question as stupid or redundant."

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This Big Ideas Course will challenge students to develop a broad scientific understanding of the concept and manifestations of Time, chiefly through the lenses of physics, geology, cosmology, and evolution. The course will include an introduction to "Big History," and there will also be some discussion of the psychology and human perception of time. The course will use mathematical tools at the level of college algebra, and will assume a high-school level understanding of physical science. Students will be asked to participate in a group term project.

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Course Website: http://bigideascourses.berkeley.edu/

Instructor: PHILLIPS, J H
LETTERS AND SCIENCE 160B P 001 LEC: Effective Personal Ethics for the 21st Century: Awakening at the Center of an Evolving Universe (3)

CCN #: 52071, which is offered MW 4-530P, 50 BIRGE

Recommendation: Satisfies Philosophy and Values breadth. Winner of the Earl Cheit Award for Excellence in Teaching. "This professor is one of the most beloved teachers on this campus. His passion, energy, and enthusiasm are contagious and genuine." "I feel, more than filling a requirement, this course has been an invaluable investment in myself." "It was the ultimate enlightening liberal arts experience I've had ever."

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Ethics comes from the Greek root ethos, meaning essential character. Each ethical decision we make (or avoid) actually co-creates who we are, our lives, our relationships, and the world we live in. Readings from Aristotle through the existentialists, an exploration of comparative religion, studies in intra- and inter-personal psychology, and cases from literature to business will orient and inspire and support students' quests to find and live their deepest values. We will investigate those characteristics and habits of human nature that hinder affirmative ethical behavior (and the realization of maximum human potential generally), and explore characteristics and practices that can foster each student's inherent imagination, creative capacity, integration, and fully satisfying participation in life and the larger Earth adventure. Ultimately, L&S 160B will empower students to transcend basic reaction to difficult and significant challenges and instead move into a genuinely creative response, thus fostering the "response-ability," stability, emotional intelligence, discrimination, and discerning self-awareness required of 21st-century global citizens.

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Course Website: http://lsdiscovery.berkeley.edu/detail_lsd.php?identity=345

Instructor: CHRZAN, D C
MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 24 P 002 LEC: Physics and Materials Science of Skateboarding (1: PF)

CCN #: 53006, which is offered Th 10-11A, 285 CORY

Recommendation: "Daryl made the class seem like a group discussion where ideas could freely be exchanged. He was very accessible and friendly." - spring 2012 seminar "Innovative topic; experiments are cool." - spring 2011 seminar "It was nice having a smaller-sized class as everyone was able to know each other. The class is amazing and offers a lot." - spring 2010 seminar

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The popularity of skateboarding and other extreme sports is increasing at a rapid pace. The sports are termed extreme in part because they place the participants and their equipment under extreme conditions. This seminar will explore the extreme conditions associated with skateboarding, and how materials science has been used to evolve the original sidewalk surfers into the modern-day skateboard. Topics to be discussed include the physics of skateboarding (including an analysis of the inevitable slam) and the implications of this physics for the design of wheels, boards, bearings, trucks and safety equipment. The course includes experiments to measure rolling friction and the breaking strength of skateboards.

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Instructor: WEISBLAT, D A
MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY 90B P 001 SEM: Biology as History (1: PF)

CCN #: 57638, which is offered W 1-2P, 107 MULFORD

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Why the leech? For thirty-plus years, now, my research has been aimed at understanding how a particular kind of leech (in the genus Helobdella) develops from egg to adult. Work in my lab involves a wide variety of techniques drawn from cell and molecular biology, classical embryology, genomics and bioinformatics. This seminar is intended for students who wish to explore and perhaps major in some area of biology, and those interested in any kind of basic research (that is, research driven more by curiosity about how things work than in trying to accomplish something "useful" - like curing a disease). One specific goal would be for me to explain how it is I came to study leech development and how our work fits in to the rest of biology. The general format consists of loosely guided conversations, driven by occasional readings, students' questions and interests.

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Instructor: LIMA, E E
NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES 39A P 001 SEM: Native Americans and the American Novel (4)

CCN #: 61233, which is offered MWF 12-1P, 174 BARROWS

Recommendation: "This class gave me the opportunity to better understand the material through conversation with the professor and my peers. It's a great class." - student in fall 2014 seminar "It exceeded my expectation because it was really interesting." - student in fall 2014 seminar

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The history and cultures of Native Americans continue to fascinate many people. But how does the way we imagine them relate to the challenges confronting Native American communities? In this seminar we will examine how Native Americans have been portrayed in four major American novels: The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper, Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather, The Surrounded by D'Arcy McNickle, and Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich. Along with learning how to read literature closely, we will also investigate the problems facing Native Americans and discuss the possible solutions posed by these novels.

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Instructor: LUCARELLI, R and Mavroudi, M
NEAR EASTERN STUDIES C188 P 001 LEC: Magic, Science and Religion (4)

CCN #: 61560, which is offered TuTh 11-1230P, 60 EVANS

Recommendation: Satisfies Historical Studies or Philosophy and Values breadth. "Everyone will agree that Professor Mavroudi is a brilliant scholar with a teaching style that is quite engaging." "Professor Lucarelli brings a deep knowledge of the subject and is very good at engaging the students."

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Modern Western societies regard reason as the ultimate source and test of knowledge and look upon science as the primary arbiter of rationality. This is the result of an intellectual attitude that became mainstream during the age of the Enlightenment (late seventeenth-late eighteenth centuries). Towards the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth century, scholars discussed the relationship between science, religion, and magic. For example, for Sir James George Frazer, one of the founding fathers of modern anthropology, human belief evolved from primitive magic to religion to science. This course will explore magic as an experimental science within the learned traditions of civilizations that we consider as fundamental for a modern Western identity: from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome to the medieval and early modern Middle East, Byzantium, and Europe. The primary sources used for this exploration will be texts on demons, magic, divination, and the sophisticated philosophical background to such beliefs. In addition, archeological remains pertinent to these practices such as talismans, amulets, and other magical objects will be discussed.

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Course Website: http://bigideascourses.berkeley.edu/

Instructor: WILDSOET, C F
VISION SCIENCE 84 P 001 SEM: Vision Research Seen through Myopia (near-sightedness) (1: PF)

CCN #: 66409, which is offered Th 4-6P, 394 MINOR

Recommendation: "Christine is an awesome professor and super kind." - student in spring 2015 seminar "The topic is very interesting, and the presentation of material really fit the structure of the class." - student in spring 2015 seminar "This is a very insightful course if you are interested in learning about a specific aspect of vision research. There is not enough time to learn everything there is to know about myopia but it is a great way to be introduced to it if you are interested." - student in spring 2014 seminar "I enjoyed learning about research that is being done to understand the causes of myopia and the environmental and genetic causes of it." - student in spring 2014 seminar

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As an introduction to vision research, this seminar will combine reading of recent review papers with hands-on research through mini-projects. Using myopia (near-sightedness) as a topical research example, we will explore together the field through recent review papers–what is known about the condition and the research approaches used to discover that information. Based on this literature, we will formulate research questions around which self- and small-group studies will be designed and executed. Research tools encountered will include questionnaires and instruments used to obtain objective measures of eye dimensions, refractive errors, vision, and visual experience. We will also consider the applications and relative merits of animal models and in vitro cell and tissue studies in myopia research.

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Instructor: POLSE, K A
VISION SCIENCE 84 P 002 SEM: Current Topics in US Healthcare (1: PF)

CCN #: 66411, which is offered Th 11-1P, 491 MINOR

Recommendation: Quotes from Fall 2014 seminar: Professor Polse is a great professor, and if you are interested in health, pre-health, or pre-public policy, you will benefit a lot from this class. [Students will] be much more familiar with the healthcare system, not just in the U.S. but around the world. It is very valuable and interesting. Professor Polse is great and you will leave understanding our healthcare system and having hope for how it can improve.

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Problems associated with affordability and accessibility of health care in the US began to escalate in the late 1980s. Over the past twenty-five years both Republican and Democratic administrations have attempted to address these problems, but without success. In 2008, President Obama was elected on a mandate to change the health care system in a way that would provide affordable and accessible care to all Americans. After considerable debate, controversy and compromise, the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act of 2010 (ACA) was passed in Congress and signed into law by President Obama on March 23, 2010. The ACA (often referred to as Obamacare) was the most significant health care legislation passed since the Medicare Act of 1964. Since the ACA has become law its constitutionality has been tested twice and upheld by the US Supreme Court. Even thought the ACA is law, the path to accessible, affordable, and high quality health care remains problematic for many individuals and families. Of particular current interest is that the ACA has again become the center stage of the 2016 Presidential elections (e.g., repeal, replace, expand, etc.). To help understand the complexities of US Health Care Delivery, we will first examine some of the major hurdles/controversies in US healthcare delivery prior to the passage of the ACA. We will then examine Obamacare looking at both its strengths and weaknesses. Finally, to help us better understand what options might be available, we will explore health care in other developed countries to help us understand both what is wrong with our current system and possible solutions. Typically, the class will review a article, news story, media presentation, or editorial that will serve as the beginning for class discussion/debate. Students will also be asked to find a specific article and give a short presentation followed by class discussions. Some of the topics will include single payer vs. third-party medical coverage; factors driving the cost of medical care; strategies to control medical costs; the role of insurance companies, pharmacological and device manufacturers, health care delivery in other developed countries; and other topics related to health care delivery.

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Instructor: BUCHANAN, B B
PLANT AND MICROBIAL BIOLOGY 24 P 003 SEM: Insight into Human Diseases Contributed by Plant Research (1: PF)

CCN #: 70981, which is offered W 2-3P, 104 GPB

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The class will focus on the protein thioredoxin and its regulatory properties that were uncovered in photosynthesis research. We will see how these findings are increasing our understanding of essential cellular processes and their connection to diseases in humans. Students will gain a general understanding of photosynthesis and other processes basic to plants as well as animal cells. Human diseases will be discussed from a general standpoint.

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Instructor: HESLOP, K S
SCANDINAVIAN 60 P 001 LEC: Heroic Legends of the North (4)

CCN #: 78524, which is offered TuTh 930-11A, 88 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature What is a hero? What use were stories about heroes to the societies that produced them? What is the relationship between heroes and gods (pagan and Christian)? Does heroic narrative preserve memories of historical events? Can monsters or women be heroes? How do heroes die, and why do their stories enjoy such a long – if not altogether blameless – afterlife? Such questions guide our engagement in this course with the heroic narratives of the Northern Middle Ages. The course has a double focus: on the hero and heroic ethos in a period of radical cultural, social and religious change; and on a particular body of literature, the Scandinavian versions of Germanic heroic narrative. It centers on the Poetic Edda, a unique medieval collection of mythological and heroic poetry whose roots reach back into the Viking Age, and perhaps still further back. But we will also explore other manifestations of the northern fascination with heroes, covering topics such as the oral transmission of heroic narrative; heroes in visual culture (runestones, sculptures, jewellery); Latin-speaking Norse heroes in Saxo grammaticus’ Gesta danorum (History of the Danes); how the heroic ethos plays out in more realistic saga genres, such as the lives of the Norwegian kings; and the late medieval flowering of heroic narrative in the Old Norse romances. A look at the post-medieval reception of heroic legend in Richard Wagner’s Ring cycle and in contemporary media (e.g. Game of Thrones, the History Channel series Vikings, video games, popular music) rounds off the course. Texts: The Poetic Edda, trans. by Carolyne Larrington, revised edition (OUP: 2014). Seven Viking Romances, trans. by Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards (Penguin: 1985). The Saga of the Völsungs, trans. by Jesse Byock (Penguin: 2000). The Sagas of Ragnar Lodbrok, trans. by Ben Waggoner (Troth: 2009). Additional texts will be made available in a Course Reader. Prerequisites: none. The course and readings are in English.

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Instructor: SANDERS, K L
SCANDINAVIAN 106 P 001 LEC: The Works of Hans Christian Andersen (4)

CCN #: 78548, which is offered TuTh 11-1230P, 20 WHEELER

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature Hans Christian Andersen’s (1805-75) international fame is primarily built on his reputation as a writer of children's fairy tales. Yet his authorship is multifaceted and complex both in terms of genres and intended reading audience. It reflects the historical and cultural concerns of his time. His written production includes poems, short stories, novels, plays, travel descriptions, autobiographies and diaries and offers a unique perspective on psychological and social questions of identity in the ninetieth century. We will investigate authorship and death, writing and sexuality, religion and philosophy, politics and ideology, and pay attention to Andersen as a "visual" writer. We will look into his distinctive way of using the material reality he encountered, examine how everyday ‘things’ are anthropomorphicized to reflect the workings of human agency, and study how his seismographic sensibility to the physical world resonated far beyond the period in which he lived (Romanticism/Realism) and extended backwards to the Enlightenment and forward to Surrealism. Andersen was an enthusiastic believer in various modern technologies and frequently imagined future modes of transport and communication. He also produced a number of sketches and paper-cuts, and he posed for numerous portraits (sculptures, paintings, photographs etc.) The course will include examinations of these visual materials. We will also investigate the reception of Andersen in popular culture: film versions, for example, of his life and his works. Texts: Hans Christian Andersen's Complete Fairy Tales and Stories. All other required materials will be available in the form of a reader. Prerequisites: None. All readings in English.

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Instructor: HIDALGO, M S
SCANDINAVIAN 120 P 001 LEC: The Scandinavian Novel: Intrigue, Murder and Madness (4)

CCN #: 78551, which is offered MWF 12-1P, 206 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature Plotting dwarves, crazed lovers, megalomaniacs, and femmes fatales – these are but a few of the characters we will encounter as we examine the haunting narratives of classic Scandinavian novels of the 19th and 20th centuries as well as suspenseful modern Scandinavian crime fiction. What sets these works apart is their ability to simultaneously tell complex stories about psychologically enigmatic characters, while at the same time raising challenging and even disturbing ethical quandaries. A guiding theme of the class will be to try to understand what it is about the formal structure of the novel that enables it to so effectively draw in readers to the ethical dilemmas faced by its characters. We will explore this theme reading classics such as Jacobsen’s Niels Lyhne, Hamsun’s Hunger, Söderberg’s Doctor Glas, Lagerkvist’s The Dwarf, and Høeg’s Smilla’s Sense of Snow. Texts: Hamsun, Knut. Hunger. Translated by Robert Bly. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998. ISBN-13: 978-0374525286 Høeg, Peter. Smilla’s Sense of Snow. Translated by Tiina Nunnally. Reprint edition. New York: Delta, 1995. ISBN-13: 9780385315142 Jacobsen, Jens Peter. Niels Lyhne. Translated by Tiina Nunnally. Penguin Classics, 2006. ISBN- 13: 978-0143039815 Lagerkvist, Pär. The Dwarf. Translated by Alexandra Dick. New York: Hill and Wang, 1958. ISBN-13: 978-0374521356 Söderberg, Hjalmar. Dr. Glas. Translated by Paul Bitten Austin. Anchor, 2002. ISBN-13: 978- 0385722674 *Additional readings will be made available in a course reader or bCourses. Prerequisites: None. The course and readings are in English.

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Instructor: BAUER, M J
SCANDINAVIAN 150 P 001 LEC: Studies in Scandinavian Literature Magic, Monsters & Miracles in Medieval Scandinavian Literature (4)

CCN #: 78587, which is offered MWF 1-2P, 247 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature The literature of medieval Scandinavia is filled with elements of what we would call the “supernatural”: the walking dead, giants and trolls, sorcery, and even Christian miracles. In this class we will explore the function of the supernatural in Icelandic literature and society. Using primary source materials in English, as well as modern scholarly writings on the fantastic, we will investigate the following questions: were supernatural phenomena believed to be true? Is it possible for us to tell? If they were not viewed as true, what role(s) did these elements play? What do they tell us about the medieval Scandinavian worldview, and how they understood the “human” and the “normal”? How did later developments in science and technology affect our worldview, and our ability to understand dramatically different cultures? In this class we will learn about the culture of medieval Scandinavia as well as various scholarly approaches to the question of the “supernatural.” Students will develop critical and analytical skills through readings, class discussion, and independent research. Texts: Course reader Prerequisites: None. The course and readings are in English.

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Instructor: ALEXANDER, R
SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 24 P 001 SEM: The Mystery and Fascination of the Balkans (1)

CCN #: 79714, which is offered W 10-11A, 6115 DWINELLE

Recommendation: "This program really did make me feel extremely comfortable and I wish it hadn't ended." - student in spring 2013 seminar "I feel that the seminar allowed me to receive a lot of attention from my professor and really get to know her." - student in spring 2015 seminar "Definitely a class worth taking to explore a different part of the world!" - student in spring 2015 seminar

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The Balkans as a region have always fascinated Westerners, ranging from intrepid eighteenth- and nineteenth-century travelers seeking the exotica of “Turkey in Europe” to their modern cohorts who become enamored of Balkan culture, and especially its music—a fascination so great that a group of middle-aged and elderly Bulgarian women who were known at home as The Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir could be marketed in the West as “Le mystère des voix bulgares” (The Mystery of Bulgarian Voices), win a Grammy, and have their songs used on the soundtrack of Xena: Warrior Princess. But the Balkan region is fascinating in a negative sense as well, that sense which has given our language the verb “to balkanize”, defined by Merriam-Webster as “to break up (as a region or group) into smaller and often hostile units." In this class we will explore two basic questions about the Balkans: What is it that makes the region such a land of contradictions and fascination? And why–especially after the intense media attention to the violent breakup of Yugoslavia–does it remain so little understood?

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Instructor: GOLBURT, L
SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 39L P 001 SEM: Russian Short Fiction (3)

CCN #: 79715, which is offered TuTh 330-5P, 187 DWINELLE

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When one thinks of Russian prose, the bulky nineteenth- and twentieth-century novels inevitably come to mind, making one’s initiation into Russian literature seem arduous, even if ultimately rewarding. Taking a different approach to introducing students to the Russian canon, this course offers a rich sampling of short stories and novellas by more than a dozen famous Russian writers, spanning a century and a half: from the sentimentalist Nikolai Karamzin (1766-1826) through such milestones as Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Nabokov, Babel, and Platonov to the contemporary writer Lyudmilla Petrushevskaya (1938-). Our discussions will focus on both the internal organization and meaning of individual stories and the historical evolution of Russian prose and its changing political and cultural contexts. This course should be of particular interest to prospective and current majors in Russian and other literatures as well as to students interested in creative writing.

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Instructor: DOUZJIAN, M
SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 46 P 001 LEC: 20th-Century Russian Literature The Subversive Imagination: Russian Literary Responses to the Soviet Experience and Its Aftermat (3)

CCN #: 79718, which is offered TuTh 330-5P, 79 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature “The Subversive Imagination” focuses on twentieth- and twenty-first-century Russian texts that challenge the established order through the depiction of imaginary worlds. That is to say, these “unrealistic” works offer a critical perspective on socio-political and cultural developments in Soviet and contemporary Russia. Our readings of individual texts will address the relationship between subversive cultural production and watersheds in Russian history, including the formation of the Soviet state, the evolution of its policies and practices, and its eventual collapse and transition into the post-Soviet era. At the same time, we will explore the ways in which the imaginary blurs the line between the supernatural and the worldly, between the impossible and the possible, between art and life. Students will be introduced to various subgenres of this type of writing: dystopia, science fiction, the fantastic, the absurd, magical realism, and the fairy tale. The course will begin by defining transgression in the context of contemporary Russian writing; it will then turn to subversive Soviet-era literature; and, finally, it will return to post-Soviet literature. This circular approach will allow us to consider the dialogue that the subversive imagination creates across different (and often compartmentalized) periods in Russian literary culture. Texts for purchase (to reduce costs, students may want to purchase used copies on amazon.com): Sorokin, Vladimir. The Blizzard: A Novel. Trans. Jamey Gambrell. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015. ISBN: 0374114374. Zamyatin, Yevgeny. We. Trans. Natasha Randall. Modern Library, 2006. ISBN: 081297462X. Bulgakov, Mikhail. The Master and Margarita. Trans. Diana Burgin and Katherine Tiernan O’Connor. Vintage, 1996. ISBN: 0679760806. Erofeev, Venedikt. Moscow to the End of the Line. Trans. H. William Tjalsma. Northwestern UP, 1992. ISBN: 0810112000. Voinovich, Vladimir. The Fur Hat. Trans. Susan Brownsberger. Mariner Books, 1991. ISBN: 0156340305. Pelevin, Victor. Homo Zapiens. Trans. Andrew Bromfield. Penguin, 2002. ISBN: 0142001813. The instructor may assign additional short readings by authors such as Vladimir Mayakovsky, Daniil Kharms, Abram Tertz, Anna Akhmatova, and Ludmilla Petrushevskaya. These will be made available on the course website. Requirements: about 100 pages of reading/week; midterm; two short response papers (2-3 pages); and final. Prerequisites: None. Readings and lectures in English. Students with knowledge of Russian are encouraged to do at least some of the reading in Russian.

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Instructor: NAIMAN, E
SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 134C P 001 LEC: Dostoevsky (4)

CCN #: 79787, which is offered TuTh 930-11A, 219 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Philosophy & Values OR Arts & Literature This course will focus on two of Dostoevsky’s novels -- Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov -- and will also include some of his shorter fiction. We will read his works as novels of ideas and as great works of literature, looking closely at the ways Dostoevsky develops ideas, characters, and plot. The main thread will be chronological, as we follow Dostoevsky’s life and the great issues of his day through the prism of his writing. Students will write two papers and take two exams, although they may choose instead an intensive writing option entailing the writing and revising of four papers. Texts: Fyodor Dostoevsky, Poor Folk (Penguin) ISBN 0-14-044505-6 (McDuff Translation) Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground and The Double (Penguin) 978-0-14-044252-6 (Coulson Translation) Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (Vintage) (Pevear and Volokhonsky, trans) ISBN 0-679-73450-3 Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Eternal Husband (Bantam) ISBN 978-0-553-21444-4 (Pevear and Volokhonsky trans) Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov (FSG) 0-374-52837-3 (Pevear and Volokhonsky Translation) Prerequisites: None. Classes and readings in English.

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Instructor: NESBET, A
SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 138 P 001 LEC: Studies in Russian and Soviet Film National Cinema: Dziga Vertov in Context (4)

CCN #: 79790, which is offered MW 1230-2P, 188 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature In this class we will study the life and work of Dziga Vertov (born David Abelevich Kaufman, a name later russified as Denis Arkadievich Kaufman), one of the most innovative filmmakers of the early twentieth century. He was a musical boy who wanted to be a poet, but in 1918 he found himself editing newsreels in Moscow; he then transferred his avant-garde aspirations into the realm of documentary cinema. We will follow the course of Vertov’s career, paying attention to the way it intersects with early Soviet cultural history and with the careers of other Soviet filmmakers artists (such as Shub, Rodchenko, Eisenstein, Kozintsev and Trauberg, Mikhail Kaufman). We will also discuss Vertov's influence on later-twentieth-century filmmakers in Europe and the United States. Prerequisites: None.

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Instructor: ALEXANDER, R
SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 147A P 001 LEC: East Slavic Folklore: Russian and Ukrainian Folklore (3)

CCN #: 79796, which is offered TuTh 1230-2P, 234 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Social & Behavioral Sciences OR Arts & Literature This course surveys the traditional tales, songs, and customs of the East Slavs. The primary focus is on Russian folklore, but some attention is paid to Ukrainian folklore as well. The course focuses primarily on traditional folklore, on recordings made in the 19th and early 20th centuries, which are presumed to have been transmitted orally through many generations. In the final weeks, however, the focus shifts to the modern age, to the ways in which this folklore heritage was transformed to serve Soviet political goals, and to the presence of a still-living minstrel tradition in the Ukraine. Requirements: two brief essays, midterm, final examination. Texts for purchase: Afanas’ev, Aleksandr, translated by Norbert Guterman. Russian Fairy Tales. Pantheon Books, 1973. ISBN: 0394730909 Bailey, James and Tatyana Ivanova. An Anthology of Russian Folk Epics. Routledge, 1998. ISBN: 0873326415 Ivanits, Linda. Russian Folk Belief. Routledge, 1992. ISBN: 0873328892 Other texts available on line Prerequisites: None. Course and readings are in English.

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Instructor: ALEXANDER, R
SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 170 P 001 LEC: Survey of Yugoslav Literatures (in English with readings in English) (3)

CCN #: 79799, which is offered TuTh 330-5P, 235 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: Arts & Literature The class will consist of four components, labeled roughly Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian and "European". Within each component we will read one book-length text written during the time of Yugoslavia (defined broadly as 1918-1991) and one written during the post-Yugoslav period (1991 to the present). Lectures will consider these works both as literary creations and as component parts of the complex historical phenomenon of Yugoslavia (both as a successful state and then as an arena of war). No prior knowledge of Yugoslav history is assumed, and all readings are in English. Requirements: four essays, final examination. Texts for purchase: David Albahari. Goetz and Meyer. Mariner Books, 2015. ISBN: 1628970928 Ivo Andrić. The Bridge on the Drina. University of Chicago Press, 1977. ISBN: 0226020452 Miljenko Jergović. Sarajevo Marlboro. Archipelago Books, 2004. ISBN: 0972869220 Danilo Kiš. A Tomb for Boris Davidovich. Dalkey Archive Press, 2001. ISBN: 1564782735 Miroslav Krleža. On the Edge of Reason. New Directions Publishing, 1995. ISBN: 0811213064 Available from used-book sellers on line: Vladimir Arsenijević, In the Hold. Knopf, 1996. Milos Tsernianski, Migrations. Harcourt, 1994. Dubravka Ugrešić, Culture of Lies. Penn State University Press, 1998. Other texts available on line Prerequisites: None. Course and readings are in English.

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Instructor: DOUZJIAN, M
ARMENIAN 124 P 001 LEC: Armenian Literature in Social Context Modern and Contemporary Armenian Literature and Culture: Across Empires, Nations, and Pe (4)

CCN #: 80309, which is offered W 2-4P, 228 DWINELLE

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L&S Breadth: International Studies OR Arts & Literature Armenian literary production has a transnational history, tied to cultural centers in the Ottoman and Russian Empires, the Soviet Union, the Republic of Armenia, and a global diaspora. This traversal of geographical boundaries forms the basis for the organizational logic of this course, which is focused on some of the Armenian literary masterpieces of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. These texts will offer a lens through which to view the socio-political contexts and cultural legacies that shape the attitudes of Armenian writers, artists, and intellectuals in our contemporary globalized world. The course will blend short lectures on the texts’ historical and socio-political background with discussions that focus on textual analysis. Several films will complement our discussions of cultural representation in literary texts. We will draw connections between our generically and thematically diverse readings by considering the following questions throughout the semester: How does literature represent Armenia as a nation? What do works of literature suggest about Armenian cultural identity and the identities of various “others”? What is the relationship between culture and politics? How has this relationship evolved? How does literature complicate our notions about cataclysmic experiences (genocide, war, exile, and displacement)? Texts for purchase (to reduce costs, students may want to purches used copies on amazon.com): Yessayan, Zabel. My Soul in Exile and Other Writings. Trans. G.M. Goshgarian, Jennifer Manoukian, and Nanore Barsoumian. AIWA Press, 2014. ISBN: 0964878771. Oshagan, Hagop. Remnants: The Way of the Womb. Trans. G.M. Goshgarian. Gomidas Institute, 2013. ISBN: 1909382086. Oshagan, Vahe and Ara Oshagan. Father Land. Trans. G. M. Goshgarian. powerHouse Books, 2010. ISBN: 1576875482. Texts to be provided by instructor: Avetik Issahakian’s Abou Lala Mahari Yeghishe Charents’s Land of Fire Shareen Anderson’s Charents: In Search of My Armenian Poet Aksel Bakunts’s The Dark Valley Gevorg Emin’s Songs of Armenia Sergei Parajanov’s The Color of Pomegranates Shahan Shahnur’s Retreat without Song Nigoghos Sarafian’s The Bois de Vincennes Aghasi Ayvazyan’s Props Violet Grigoryan’s “African Kiss,” “The City,” “Love,” “Harem Rose,” and “Unfinished Ode: Upon the Clitoris” Krikor Beledian’s “Deviation” Jivan Avetisyan’s Tevanik Ronald Suny’s "Soviet Armenia" Khachig Tölölyan’s "Elites and Institutions in the Armenian Transnation" Angela Harutyunyan and Eric Goodfield’s "Theorizing the Politics of Representation in Contemporary Armenia" Prerequisites: None. Readings, lectures, and discussion in English. Students with knowledge of Armenian are encouraged to do at least some of the reading in Armenian. Requirements: regular attendance; 100-200 pages of reading/week; midterm; oral presentation; and individual project in lieu of a final.

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Instructor: LLAGAS, K
SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES 39J P 001 SEM: Exploring the Short Story in the Philippines and Indonesia (2)

CCN #: 83515, which is offered F 10-12P, 205 WHEELER

Recommendation: "Found a great atmosphere within the course; professors are very approachable and passionate about teaching." - spring 2013 seminar "The interaction between teacher and students was outstanding." - spring 2013 seminar

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In both the Philippines and Indonesia, the short story is an important vehicle for artistic, emotional and socio-political expression and experimentation. This seminar will introduce students to some of the major contemporary themes, including romance, resistance, gender, and the challenges of modernization and the new global order. The comparative perspective will enrich our understanding of the strong narrative traditions of these two important countries of island Southeast Asia.

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Instructor: BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M
SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES 39L P 001 SEM: Contentious Politics and Southeast Asian Literature (Focus on Vietnam and the Philippines) (2)

CCN #: 83517, which is offered F 2-4P, 204 DWINELLE

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Do you like debates? How do you think people can debate about politics through literature? This course looks into the dynamics of literature and politics in Vietnam and the Philippines by asking the following questions: How have writers articulated their beliefs on colonialism, human rights, gender and class through poetry and fiction? When does ideology inform literary techniques? How can we study specific genres such as prison literature, testimonial literature, guerrilla literature, and underground newspapers and literary magazines?

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Instructor: WENTWORTH, B T
SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES 120 P 002 LEC: The Philosophies of Classical India (4)

CCN #: 83539, which is offered TuTh 1230-2P, 215 DWINELLE

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N/A

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Instructor: EDWARDS, P S
SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES 120 P 003 LEC: Southeast Asian Literature as Cultural Trans/Action (4)

CCN #: 83542, which is offered TuTh 2-330P, 209 DWINELLE

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This course, jointly taught by professors Sylvia Tiwon and Penny Edwards, introduces students to the literature of Southeast Asia by exploring how fiction, poetry and drama engage their social and cultural contexts. We will discuss how works of modern literature emerge from oral and court traditions, the impact of early global trade, the colonial encounter and nationalist movements.

Literature has played a critical role in Southeast Asian cultural, social and political life both as a source of aesthetic pleasure and entertainment, and for its persuasive powers. Thinking of literature as cultural action enables us to see Southeast Asian writers and poets as change agents whose work cannot be quarantined as “culture” but has deeper implications for struggles to improve the human condition in multiple social and political contexts. Our focus on “trans” embraces both the polyphonic world of Southeast Asian literary production, and the literature of estrangement penned by Southeast Asians overseas and Europeans in Southeast Asia.

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Instructor: BLUM, M L
SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES C145 P 001 LEC: Buddhism in Contemporary Society (4)

CCN #: 83551, which is offered TuTh 1230-2P, 3 LECONTE

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N/A

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Instructor: PARAMASIVAN, V
SOUTH ASIAN 1B P 001 LEC: Introduction to the Civilization of Medieval and Modern India (4)

CCN #: 84003, which is offered TuTh 11-1230P, 219 DWINELLE

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N/A

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Instructor: GOLDMAN, R P
SOUTH ASIAN 110 P 001 LEC: Introduction to Hinduism (4)

CCN #: 84023, which is offered MWF 11-12P, 219 DWINELLE

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N/A

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Instructor: WINET, E D
SOUTHEAST ASIAN 10B P 001 LEC: Peoples and Cultures of Island Southeast Asia (4)

CCN #: 84103, which is offered MWF 9-10A, 170 BARROWS

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This course is an introduction to the cultures, histories, religions and arts of Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore and East Timor. We will explore indigenous and exogenous frameworks for understanding the region from its early and mythological states to the present. As much as possible, we will look to original source materials with a dual emphasis, firstly on traditional and modern rituals and artistic performances, and secondly, on formal and informal mechanisms of law and governance. All materials will be presented in English, and no previous language or area expertise is required.

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Instructor: SAN JOSE, S
THEATER, DANCE, AND PERFORMANCE ST 100 P 001 STD: COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION (4)

CCN #: 88199, which is offered TuTh 2-5P, 145 MOFFITT

Recommendation: Satisfies Arts and Literature breadth

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In this hands-on, project-based class in collaborative innovation, students will experience group creativity and team-based design by using techniques from across the disciplines of business, theatre, design, and art practice. They will leverage problem framing and solving techniques derived from critical thinking, systems thinking, and creative problem solving (popularly known today as "design thinking"). The course is grounded in a brief weekly lecture that sets out the theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts for particular innovation practices, but the majority of the class involves hands-on studio-based learning guided by an interdisciplinary team of teachers leading small group collaborative projects. Students will experience observation, problem-framing, divergent and convergent thinking, iterative solution testing, improvisation, storytelling, devised theatre, and public speaking and presentation activities. By engaging in these activities, ​the course ​provide​s​ students with​ ​the ​opportunity to develop new mindsets, skill-sets and toolsets for use in collaborative innovation efforts.

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Instructor: COLE, C M
THEATER, DANCE, AND PERFORMANCE ST 100 P 002 STD: COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION (4)

CCN #: 88202, which is offered TuTh 2-5P, NO FACILITY

Recommendation: Satisfies Arts and Literature breadth

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In this hands-on, project-based class in collaborative innovation, students will experience group creativity and team-based design by using techniques from across the disciplines of business, theatre, design, and art practice. They will leverage problem framing and solving techniques derived from critical thinking, systems thinking, and creative problem solving (popularly known today as "design thinking"). The course is grounded in a brief weekly lecture that sets out the theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts for particular innovation practices, but the majority of the class involves hands-on studio-based learning guided by an interdisciplinary team of teachers leading small group collaborative projects. Students will experience observation, problem-framing, divergent and convergent thinking, iterative solution testing, improvisation, storytelling, devised theatre, and public speaking and presentation activities. By engaging in these activities, ​the course ​provide​s​ students with​ ​the ​opportunity to develop new mindsets, skill-sets and toolsets for use in collaborative innovation efforts.

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This page was last updated on 3/28/2016 10:14:26 PM